Air Bag Recall Part 2

Air Bag Recall Part 2

Published on 29 October 2020
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Transcript
00:05
April 13, 2016: Regulators state that there are 85 million potentially defective, unrecalled Takata airbag inflators that will need to be recalled—unless Takata can prove they are safe. So far, the recall has included 28.8 million airbags in the U.S.
00:10
April 7, 2016: A 17-year-old girl from Texas named as the 10th U.S. victim. She was driving a 2002 Honda Civic. Her death is attributed to shrapnel from the exploding airbag striking her neck. NHTSA shows that 7,522,533 airbags have been repaired.
00:15
Oct. 20, 2016: NHTSA confirms the 11th fatality. It occurred in a 2001 Honda Civic, a vehicle that was recalled in 2008. The recall had not been performed on this specific car. Nine of the 11 Takata-related deaths in the U.S. have occurred in Acura and Honda models. Honda reports that there are just under 300,000 affected vehicles that have not been repaired or accounted for. Key lesson: Take recall notices seriously.
00:20
Jan. 12, 2017: Reports of an expected $1 billion penalty against Takata are published, with the expectation that $25 million will be a criminal penalty and $850 million would be paid as restitution to automakers affected by the recall.
00:25
Feb. 28, 2017: Takata has finally pleaded guilty to deceiving automakers about the safety of its airbags. Now automakers are disputing charges that they knowingly installed the defective airbags in their cars.
00:31
June 26, 2017: Takata files for bankruptcy.
00:36
Feb. 23, 2018: A U.S. bankruptcy judge in Delaware approved a plan negotiated by Takata and its creditors to create a trust fund to compensate the victims of exploding airbag inflators. Automakers are giving up some monetary claims against Takata and agreeing to contribute $90 million to $137 million to the trust fund.
00:42
July 17, 2018: Ford’s class-action settlement agreement over Takata airbags promises to give consumers some relief. It’s the seventh such deal cut by the class-action attorneys handling claims against the 19 car companies. The owners of Ford vehicles who agree to the deal will receive free loaner cars while waiting for their Takata repairs, as well as small cash payments for their out-of-pocket expenses.
00:48
March 29, 2019: Honda and NHTSA announce that a driver of a 2002 Honda Civic was in a crash on June 8, 2018, in Buckeye, Ariz. The driver was injured by the ruptured airbag inflator and died in a hospital June 11, 2018. The automaker says it is the 14th death in a Honda vehicle related to the Takata airbag inflators; 16 people have been killed because of the airbags in the U.S. The driver was the current owner of the Civic and had purchased the car less than three months before the incident.
00:53
Sept. 30, 2020: Honda and NHTSA confirm that a defective Takata driver’s airbag inflator ruptured in the crash of a 2002 Honda Civic on Aug. 20, 2020, in Mesa, Ariz. The driver of the vehicle sustained injuries from the ruptured inflator and subsequently died. Honda has now confirmed 15 deaths and more than 200 injuries in the U.S. related to Takata airbag driver’s front inflator ruptures in the field. The vehicle involved in this crash had been under recall since December 2011 for replacement of the original Takata driver’s frontal airbag inflator. The original Takata passenger’s frontal airbag inflator was also included in a June 2014 safety improvement campaign that transitioned into a recall in November 2014. Starting in January 2012, more than 15 mailed recall notices were sent over the course of eight years to registered owners of this vehicle before the August 2020 crash. In addition, Honda made numerous phone calls in an attempt to reach owners of this vehicle and physically visited the address of the current owner, leaving recall information attached to the home’s front door. The driver killed in this crash was not the registered owner of the vehicle.
01:06
Disaster & Ramifications
01:31
The airbag then changed to a different propellent because if they did not the airbag would explode if it was too humid.