Air Bag Recalls

Air Bag Recalls

Published on 29 October 2020
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Transcript
00:00
Air Bag Recalls
00:00
By: Colin Vernon
00:05
I chose the disaster of Air Bag Recalls.
00:07
The reason that I chose this was that it needs to be shown that it is dangerous and these recalls need to be taken seriously
00:10
Construction & USE
00:15
The accident was a car going off the road and he had to hold a person from going flying forward
00:15
Also it was made to reduce the injuries as a result of emergency braking
00:15
The reason that the air bag was first made was actually because of a accident that happened to the inventor.
00:20
The comapny chose was TAKATA the reason is because they are the standard and did a good job for ththe most part.
00:25
The price of the patent for the Air Bags in the 1960's was $250.
00:25
The Cost of Air Bags on average is $4,000.
00:27
Today
00:32
SiZE
00:37
The size compressed is 2 5/8 inches to the top of the spring and 4 3/4 inches to the top of the valve When expanded the size is 6 1/8 inches to the top of the spring and 7 5/8 inches to the top of the valve.
00:42
Any Motor Vehicle
00:42
Where they are Used
00:42
For Example in Cars they are in the Steering Wheel and the side doors
00:42
Car,MotorCycle,Truck, etc....
00:47
The bag itself is made of a thin, nylon fabric, which is folded into the steering wheel or dashboard or, more recently, the seat or door.
00:47
The Materials
00:53
Timeline
00:56
2008 Nov. 4: Honda Motor recalls 4,000 Accornd Civics (2001 models) globally as Takata airbag inflators may produce excessive internal pressure causing them to rupture and spray metal fragments in the car.
01:02
May 27: Oklahoma teen Ashley Parham dies when the airbag in her 2001 Honda Accord explodes, shooting metal fragments into her neck. Honda and Takata deny fault and settle for an undisclosed sum.
01:02
2009
01:08
Dec. 24: Gurjit Rathore is killed in Virginia when the airbag in a 2001 Accord explodes after a minor accident, severing arteries in her neck, court documents show. Her family sues Honda and Takata for more than $75 million in April 2011, claiming they knew of the airbag problems as early as 2004. Honda and Takata settle in January 2013 for $3 million, according to court documents.
01:13
2011 April 27: Honda recalls 896,000 Honda and Acura 2001-03 cars in order to find defective Takata airbag inflators installed as replacement parts.
01:18
2013
01:18
April 11: Toyota Motor, Honda, Nissan Motor and Mazda Motor recall 3.4 million vehicles globally due to possibly defective Takata airbags.
01:28
Sept. 3: Devin Xu dies in a 2002 Acura TL sedan in a parking lot accident near Los Angeles from "apparent facial trauma due to foreign object inside air bag," according to a coroner's report.
01:40
Oct. 2: Orlando woman Hien Thi Tran dies four days after her 2001 Accord is in an accident in which the airbag explodes, shooting out shrapnel, according to a police report.
01:40
2014
01:46
Nov. 7: The New York Times reports Takata ordered technicians to destroy results of tests on some airbags after finding cracks in inflators. Democratic lawmakers call for criminal probe into Takata.
01:53
Nov. 20: U.S. Senate hearing into Takata airbag crisis.
01:59
Dec. 4: At U.S. Senate hearing, Takata says unable yet to find “root cause” of airbag ruptures.
02:04
Jan. 29: Honda says 35-year-old Carlos Solis was killed in Houston in a 2002 Accord fitted with a Takata airbag that may have ruptured.
02:04
2015
02:10
May 13: Toyota says it will recall 5 million cars globally, including Corolla and Vitz models from 2003-07; Nissan to recall 1.56 million cars, taking overall global recalls to more than 31 million in eight years.
02:15
May 19: Takata acknowledges that its airbag inflators in nearly 34 million vehicles are defective, which could prompt one of the largest recalls for a safety defect in U.S. history.
02:21
June 4: Reuters reports that at least 400,000 replaced airbag inflators will need to be recalled and replaced again.
02:26
Nov. 3, 2015: NHTSA imposes a record civil penalty of up to $200 million against Takata. (Of that, $70 million is a cash penalty, with an additional $130 million charge if Takata fails to meet its commitments.) Plus, the government agency requires Takata to phase out the manufacture and sale of inflators that use the risky propellant and recall all Takata ammonium nitrate inflators currently on the road—unless the company can prove they are safe or can show it has determined why its inflators are prone to rupture.