Culminating Project, MP1 part 1

Culminating Project, MP1 part 1

Published on 6 November 2022

First part in the culminating project, covers thesis and the first source's evidence and analysis.

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Transcript
00:01
Was community or individuality more prominent in Early American Literature?
00:06
Early American literature emphasized people being connected and governed as a community in contrast to a solitary society; which is reveled through the works of Winthrop's "A model of Christian Charity," and the Native American myth "The Earth on the Turtle's Back."
00:19
Winthrop's evidence and analysis
00:19
"Love is the bond of perfection. First it is a bond or ligament. Secondly, it makes the work perfect. There is no body but consists of parts and that which knits these parts together, gives the body its perfection, because it makes each part so contiguous to others as thereby they do mutually participate with each other, both in strength and infirmity, in pleasure and pain. To instance in the most perfect of all bodies: Christ and his Church make one body. The several parts of this body considered a part before they were united, were as disproportionate and as much disordering as so many contrary qualities or elements, but when Christ comes, and by his spirit and love knits all these parts to himself and each other, it is become the most perfect and best proportioned body in the world," (Winthrop 4).
00:56
Winthrop's extended metaphor of love helps the listeners and readers understand the importance of unity. Love is not integral to a society where no one cares for another, but Winthrop's vision is not that. He wants to create a society where compassion and Christianity form a caring world in contrast to the seemingly tainted land of Europe. This love for both Jesus and others will create one body and will be "a city upon a hill" to show everyone that community and love will bring prosperity to those who allow it.
01:19
"We must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities , for the  supply of others' necessities. We must uphold a familiar commerce tog- ether in all meekness, gentleness, patience and liberality. We must deli- ght in each other; make others' conditions our own; rejoice together,  mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work, as members of the same  body," (Winthrop 7).
01:40
The success of New England depends entirely on the kindness and gener- osity of its citizens. These people must work together and be patient with one another, to keep the promise they made to Christ and to uphold the  principles of the Bible. Had this Puritan society been made up of individ- uals who didn't work and empathize with their countrymen, then New England would have failed.