Doodle Animation [copy]

Doodle Animation [copy]

Published on 21 October 2020
Transcript
00:04
Cyberbullying
00:06
by Melody Kempis
00:09
What is cyberbullying?
00:09
Cyberbullying is the use of technology to harass, intimidate, embarrass, abuse or target another person (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.). Cyberbullying is a form of bullying (kidshelpline, 2020). Cyberbullying is different to other forms of bullying and can be more distressing because it can be very public and uncontrollable, for example bullies can be anonymous and content can go viral quickly (ReachOut Australia, 2020).
00:24
1 in 3 Young Australians reported being cyberbullied in 2017 (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
00:25
eSafety Commissioner, (n.d.) found that 1 in 5 young Australians admitted to Cyberbullying someone else. Of these people, more than 90% had experienced a negative experience online.
00:32
The effect bullying can have is tremendous and negative which people experience in different ways. Some of the effects might be... (kidshelpine, 2020).
00:36
• trouble sleeping • trouble concentrating and difficulty coping • loss of appetite • loss of self esteem • suicidal feelings and ideation • feeling sick physically as well as mentally • feelings of hopelessness and powerlessness • feeling alone, sad, angry, afraid and confused
00:41
What is an example of cyberbullying?
00:42
There are many forms of Cyberbullying such as abusive texts or emails. Humiliating posts about another person. Making or spreading gossip online or via chat. Creating fake accounts to trick, abuse or humiliate someone. Sending hurtful messages, images or videos. Imitating another person publicly or privately online. Excluding another person online (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
00:53
It’s important for teachers and parents to know that children may not tell adults that they are being cyberbullied because they fear an overreaction (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
00:60
Some signs that a teacher can watch out for that may indicate that someone is being cyberbullied are
01:00
• becoming upset after using the internet or phone • they have personality changes • appear to be lonely or distressed • sudden changes in friendship grounps • a decline in school work or health • changes in their sleep • avoidance of school
01:11
What can teachers do about cyberbullying?
01:16
Students may experience cyberbullying in or outside of the classroom and teachers can prevent cyberbullying and teach eSafety habits (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.). School is a place for social, emotional and academic development of students so it is vital that students are taught to use the internet safely and given the skills to navigate the digital world safely and to deal with bullying (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:20
Here are some ways schools can help to prevent cyberbullying from occuring.
01:22
Schools can include cyberbullying strategies in school online safety policies (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:28
Schools can support students experiencing cyberbullying by reporting the bullying material to the relevant social media service and if that fails, schools can support students to report it to eSafety (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:34
Schools can support students experiencing cyberbullying by reporting the bullying material to the relevant social media service and if that fails, schools can support students to report it to eSafety (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:41
Schools should encourage all students to be ‘upstanders’ who speak out against cyberbullying by reporting any cyberbullying to a teacher or adult (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:48
Schools should refer students with social, academic or mental health troubles to student support services (eSafety Commissioner, n.d.).
01:54
Thank you for watching!