ionic compounds

ionic compounds

Published on 12 November 2020

all the info you need on ionic compounds

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Transcript
00:00
ionic compounds
00:02
By Liam jay
00:05
Ionic compound meaning “In chemistry, an ionic compound is a chemical compound composed of ions held together by electrostatic forces termed ionic bonding. The compound is neutral overall, but consists of positively charged ions called cations and negatively charged ions called anions”
00:05
What is an ionic compound?
00:10
structure of an ionic compound
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An ionic compound is a giant structure of ions.The ions have a regular, repeating arrangement called an ionic lattice .The lattice is formed because the ions attract each other and form a regular pattern with oppositely charged ions next to each other.
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what happens when soluble ionic compounds are mixed in water.
00:15
When ionic compounds dissolve in water, they break apart into the ions that make them up through a process called dissociation. When placed in water, the ions are attracted to the water molecules, each of which carries a polar charge. The ionic solution turns into an electrolyte, meaning it can conduct electricity.
00:20
At the molecular level, salt dissolves in water due to electrical charges and due to the fact that both water and salt compounds are polar, with positive and negative charges on opposite sides in the molecule. Water molecules pull the sodium and chloride ions apart, breaking the ionic bond that held them together.
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Explain in term of forces between molecules why water can dissolve an ionic compound like salt.
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What are covalent bonds?
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A covalent bond, also called a molecular bond, is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms. These electron pairs are known as shared pairs or bonding pairs, and the stable balance of attractive and repulsive forces between atoms, when they share electrons, is known as covalent bonding.
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What are simple molecules?
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Simple molecules contain only a few atoms held together by covalent bonds . An example is carbon dioxide (CO 2), the molecules of which contain one atom of carbon bonded with two atoms of oxygen.
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What are giant covalent structures?
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Giant covalent structures contain very many atoms , each joined to adjacent atoms by covalent bonds . The atoms are usually arranged into giant regular lattices - extremely strong structures because of the many bonds involved.
00:40
A diamond blade has a round steel core with the edge is coated with tiny diamond particles which is held together by a soft metal the glues them. They can easily scratch things. The diamond blades don’t cut but they grind. That is why diamond blades don’t need to have sharp teeth, this means that these blades can be handled with less risk of getting cut yourself.
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Why can diamond cut through concrete?
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Diamond is a carbon that each carbon atom is joined to for other carbon, forming a giant covalent structure. Diamond is a ultra hard and has a high melting point that explains why diamond is used in cutting tools. It doesn’t conduct electricity.Silica know as silicon dioxide that is found in sand has a similar structure to diamond, so its properties are like diamond. It’s hard and has a high melting point, but contains silicon and oxygen atoms, instead of carbon atoms.
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why diamond is so hard, and graphite soft and slippery?
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Very high melting points because a lot of strong covalent bonds that have to brake. Variable electrical conductivity is diamonds that doesn’t conduct electricity, whereas graphite contains free electrons so it does conduct electricity. Silicon is a semi-conductor that is a midway between non-conductive and conductive. Graphite is a form of carbon that the carbon atoms that form layers. The layers can slide over each other, so the graphite is a lot softer that diamond. It’s used in pencils and as a lubricant. Each carbon atom in a layer is joined to only three other carbon atoms. Graphite conducts electricity. Graphite has a melting point of more of than 3,600 degrees.
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giant covalent structures and properties of diamond and graphite.
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