LAB 7

LAB 7

Published on 24 October 2020
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SR
Transcript
00:04
False memories & anchoring effect
00:11
What is the "False Memory" phenomenon?
00:13
What is the "False Memory" phenomenon?
00:14
The cognitive tendency, to either remember events that never happened, or remembering them quite differently from the way they happened in reality.
00:23
Ex: Trauma
01:08
decisions are unconsciously set around the anchor.
01:08
Once the emphasis is put on the anchor, our future judgements and
01:08
Ex. Shopping
01:08
information offered beforehand
01:08
A cognitive bias in the decision making process that is influenced by the
01:08
What is the Anchoring Effect?
01:58
Kimberley Wade et al, 2010
01:58
"Anchoring Effects in the Development of False Childhood Memories"
02:07
"Anchoring Effects in the Development of False Childhood Memories"
02:55
References
02:55
Roediger, H. L., & McDermott, K. B. (1995). Creating false memories: Remembering words not presented in lists. Journal of experimental psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21(4), 803. Danziger, S., Levav, J., & Avnaim-Pesso, L. (2011). Extraneous factors in judicial decisions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(17), 6889-6892. Bryant, Ben. “Judges Are More Lenient after Taking a Break, Study Finds.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 11 Apr. 2011, www.theguardian.com/law/2011/apr/11/judges-lenient-break.