Project 0

Project 0

Published on 12 April 2021
VG
Transcript
00:00
How an organism maintains homeostasis through the interaction of the various organ systems in the body
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Vince Regil Gravanza 12-St. Patrick
00:04
Each organ system performs specific functions for the body, and each organ system is typically studied independently. However, the organ systems also work together to help the body maintain homeostasis.
00:10
The cardiovascular, urinary, and lymphatic systems all help the body control water balance.
00:16
The cardiovascular and lymphatic systems transport fluids throughout the body and help sense both solute and water levels and regulate pressure
00:24
If the water level gets too high
00:29
the urinary system produces more dilute urine (urine with a higher water content) to help eliminate the excess water.
00:35
If the water level gets too low
00:41
More concentrated urine is produced so that water is conserved.
00:46
The digestive system also plays a role with variable water absorption. Water can be lost through the integumentary and respiratory systems
00:51
but that loss is not directly involved in maintaining body fluids and is usually associated with other homeostatic mechanisms.
00:58
Similarly, the cardiovascular, integumentary, respiratory, and muscular systems work together to help the body maintain a stable internal temperature.
01:07
If the body temperature rises
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blood vessels in the skin dilate, allowing more blood to flow near the skin’s surface. This allows heat to dissipate through the skin and into the surrounding air.
01:18
The skin may also produce sweat if the body gets too hot; when the sweat evaporates, it helps to cool the body.
01:25
Another way the body dissipates excess heat to maintain homeostasis is through exhalation. Air that enters the lungs is warmed by body heat and then exhaled.
01:30
Together, these responses to increased body temperature explain why you sweat, pant, and become red in the face when you exercise hard.
01:37
Conversely, if your body is too cold, blood vessels in the skin contract, and blood flow to the extremities (arms and legs) slows.
01:44
Muscles contract and relax rapidly, which generates heat to keep you warm.
01:50
The hair on your skin rises, trapping more air, which is a good insulator, near your skin.
01:55
These responses to decreased body temperature explain why you shiver, get “goose bumps,” and have cold, pale extremities when you are cold.
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The End