Project 6

Project 6

Published on 15 June 2022
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
Transcript
00:00
dental hygiene 
00:06
dental hygiene is important to : reduce the risk of diseases like gum disease gingivitis Periodontitis Tooth wear
00:14
dental hygiene techniques: 
00:15
brush all tooth surfaces at least twice a day both powered and manual toothbrushes are effective for plaque control thorough cleaning may take at least 2 minutes
00:25
acidic foods tend to damage teeth more than other foods, also sugary foods cause teeth decay.
00:25
sweets, chocolate, cakes and biscuits. sugary drinks, including soft drinks, fizzy drinks, milky drinks with added sugar, and alcohol. are all bad for teeth.
00:38
the consequences of ignoring dental hygiene are:
00:48
tooth decay gum disease tooth lose bad breath
00:48
these problems are bad for health and should be avoided. 
00:54
Oral hygiene practices include toothbrushing and the use of other aids for cleaning teeth. Toothbrushing is widely practiced across the UK. In a 2009 national survey of adults (1), more women reported cleaning their teeth at least twice a day than men (82% compared with 67%).
00:54
stats
01:07
Toothbrushing is important throughout life. The overall goal is to achieve and maintain good oral hygiene as follows: clean all tooth surfaces, and the gum line, thoroughly with a toothbrush and fluoride-containing toothpaste at least twice a day (last thing at night or before bed and one other time), spitting out the excess toothpaste, use additional cleaning aids to reach interproximal surfaces, as appropriate. The risk of dental caries and periodontal diseases can both be reduced by the practice of regular, careful oral hygiene involving toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste.
01:25
A 2013 survey found that mouthwash was the most common aid other than a toothbrush (manual or powered) and toothpaste. As expected, the use of mouthwashes, dental floss (the only interdental cleaning method investigated) and sugar-free gum was generally higher in older children. Approximately 40% of the school children surveyed used a powered toothbrush.
01:36
There is moderate-certainty evidence to suggest that powered toothbrushes reduce plaque and gingivitis more than manual toothbrushing
01:45
There is low to very low-certainty evidence that using some dental cleaning aids in addition to tooth cleaning (for example, interdental brushes and floss) reduce gingivitis and plaque, but the clinical importance of the effect sizes is uncertain. The findings suggest that interdental brushes may be more effective than floss and the evidence for tooth cleaning sticks and oral irrigators is limited and inconsistent. Daily cleaning is recommended between the teeth to below the gum line. Ideally this should take place throughout adult life and start earlier if there are signs of gingivitis.